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The VSS Southern Eclipsing Binaries Programme
Tom Richards

Yes, astronomy is fascinating and exciting to read about. And yes, it's fascinating and exciting to see the denizens of the sky through a telescope or to capture them with an image. But how about doing some astronomy; contributing to the science instead of just absorbing it? Eclipsing binaries offer a way in that's simple, un-demanding of equipment, doesn't need you outside all hours of the night, produces exciting results out of every night's imaging, and can even be done on a computer instead of a telescope. The Southern Eclipsing Binaries Programme of Variable Stars South is designed to provide all of that to the beginner in astronomical research, as well as keeping the experts Very busy. A 2013 RASNZ Conference paper.
Volume 52, number 2. June 2013. P3

2013 Murray Geddes Prize - Grant Christie

Volume 52, number 2. June 2013. P7

Bus Tour
On the Friday afternoon before the opening of the 2103 conference in Invercargill, attendees were invited to join a bus tour to the Unwin Radar and ESA Tracking Station at Awarua, and to Richardson's Truck Museum in Invercargill. About 30 people participated despite a cold windy day. Here are three photos from the trip.

Volume 52, number 2. June 2013. P8

A Journey from the Antipodes to the Stars and Back
Margaret Austin

Hon Margaret Austin CNZM, CRSNZ, FNZIM, D.Sc (honoris causa), Chair, Lake Tekapo Aoraki/Mt Cook Starlight Reserve Working Party. Margaret has made an amazing contribution to New Zealand and especially to astronomy in recent times. Her experience with UNESCO and the World Heritage Committee has been applied towards establishing the Aoraki Mackenzie area as a Starlight World Heritage Area. This is an ongoing long term project marked with many meetings, contacts and journeys around the world. This is her after dinner speech at the 2013 RASNZ Conference in Invercargill.
Volume 52, number 2. June 2013. P9

Reflective and Refractory: Some Observatins of NZ Amateur Astronomy
R W EVans

OVer my five decades involvement in NZ amateur astronomy, I reflect on contributions made by Various people over this time and the observing programmes that they and I have participated in. This is strictly personal so I know that I'm going to miss out a lot of people. They are for others to speak of.
Volume 52, number 2. June 2013. P11

A Grazing Occultation of SAO 138754
Brian Loader

The observation of a grazing lunar occultation with some unusual features is described.
Volume 52, number 2. June 2013. P17

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What's in a Name? -- VII
Pam Kilmartin

This is the seventh talk given to an RASNZ conference on the subject of minor planet names. It was presented in 2012, at the Carterton conference.
Volume 52, number 1. March 2013. P3

The Discovery of Planets and its Implications
Ed Budding

This is Part 2: Outside the Sphere, of the Fellows' Lecture given at the RASNZ 2012 Annual Conference in Carterton.
Volume 52, number 1. March 2013. P6

Royal Astronomical Society of New Zealand (Inc) Annual Report of Council for 2012

Volume 52, number 1. March 2013. P9

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Carter Observatory Planetarium
Gordon Hudson

A history of the Zeiss Planetarium now set up in the Heritage Park, Whangarei, which started its life Wellington.
Volume 51, number 4. December 2012. P3

35 Degrees South Planetarium
Jane Painter

In September 2012 the Northland Astronomical Society's new Planetarium was officially opened housing the Zeiss ZKP1 projector previously used at the Carter Observatory.
Volume 51, number 4. December 2012. P5

What's in a name? - VI
Pam Kilmartin

This is the sixth talk given to a RASNZ conference on the subject of minor planet names. It was presented in 2005 at the Nelson conference.
Volume 51, number 4. December 2012. P8

A new dark syk reserve for the Central South Island of New Zealand
John Hearnshaw

The Aoraki Mackenzie International Dark Sky reserve is just the third International Dark Sky Reserve in the world, and it is the world's largest.
Volume 51, number 4. December 2012. P10

The discovery of planets and its implications
Ed Budding

This is "Part 1: The Factual Basis" of the Fellows Lcture given at the RASNZ 2012 Annual Conference in Carterton.
Volume 51, number 4. December 2012. P12

A .pdf for this issue is not currently available.

Active Region 11520
Robert W Evans and Harry Roberts

One paradox of solar activity is that spots cover only a tiny fraction of the Sun's visible area: AR11520, was just 0.14% of the disc - yet it rightly attracted attention as the biggest southern group for Solar Cycle 24, so far, and second biggest overall. If you have 'eclipse glasses' you could have seen it without a telescope.
Volume 51, number 3. September 2012. P3

Transit of Venus - Cambridge, UK
John Harper

The author reminisces over viewing the 2004 transit from Cambridge, UK, and the missed view of the 2012 transit from Wellington.
Volume 51, number 3. September 2012. P6

Transit of Venus - Palmerson North
Maurice Collins

The author describes his experiences observing the transit from his home.
Volume 51, number 3. September 2012. P7

Transit of Venus in the footsteps of Captain Cook
Ian Morison

The author observed the Transit of Venus from "Astronomer's Point" in Fjordland where Captain Cook obtained a precise position in Latitude and Longitude.
Volume 51, number 3. September 2012. P8

Transit of Venus - Alexandra
Alan Thomas

The author visited three schools in Central Otago for the students to view the transit.
Volume 51, number 3. September 2012. P10

Transit of Venus - Hawkes Bay
Jim McAloon

The author chased the transit into Hawkes Bay to escape from the Wellington rain.
Volume 51, number 3. September 2012. P11

Transit of Venus - Invercargill
R W Evans

An unsuccessful bid to time the transit's contacts is described.
Volume 51, number 3. September 2012. P12

Emeritus Professor John Bullamore Mackie OBE, ED, DSc (Hon), MSc, BE, AOSM, FNZIS, FGS, FRASNZ, MIPENZ
1910 - 2012

Glen Rowe The Society's oldest member, Fellow and former President John Mackie passed away on 7 July 2012 peacefully at his home surrounded by family. This obituary is written by his former student and also former President of the Society.
Volume 51, number 3. September 2012. P13

Book Review - Using SI Units in Astronomy
William Tobin

Volume 51, number 3. September 2012. P15

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Solar Eclipse of 2011 November 25
Jay Pasachoff

The solar eclipse of November 25 viewed from Invercargill and elsewhere.
Volume 51, number 2. June 2012. P3

BONZER: Backyard Observatories in New Zealand for Educational Radioastronomy
Ian Gallagher and Ed Budding

A short review is given of Emerald Hill Radio-interferometer, including notes on the historical context in which it arose and an illustration of how the kind of data it produces could be processed to yield significant information.
Volume 51, number 2. June 2012. P5

NACAA XXV
R W Evans

The 25th National Australian Convention of Amateur Astronomers was held over Easter 2012 at the University of Queensland, Brisbane. I spent three fascinating days at the convention and report briefly on the proceedings.
Volume 51, number 2. June 2012. P9

TTOS6 at NACAA XXV
Jacquie Milner

The Sixth Trans-Tasman Symposium on Occultations (TTSO6) was held as part of NACAA XXV on Monday 9th April 2012 but presentations relating to occultations were given on both days of the main convention as well.
Volume 51, number 2. June 2012. P12

The Townsend Observatory
Karen Pollard

I outline the history of the Townsend Telescope and Observatory located in the Arts Centre of Christchurch. The telescope, which is owned and operated by the University of Canterbury, was severely damaged by the collapse of the Observatory Tower in the magnitude 6.3 Christchurch earthquake of 22 February 2011, but, amazingly, the optics are entirely intact. The intention is to restore the historic telescope.
Volume 51, number 2. June 2012. P15

DSLR Photometry with Variable Stars South
Stan Walker, Mark Blackford, Glen Schrader

Forty years ago many amateurs were trying to find methods of using conventional cameras for scientific astronomy with little success. But the wheel has turned and after the complexities of classical PEP and CCD photometry it is now possible to use digital cameras, preferably DSLR, with simple techniques to obtain high quality observations in BVRc of the standard colour system. This discussion covers equipment requirements, observing and reduction methods, suitable projects and their goals and provides practical illustrations in several observational research areas.
Volume 51, number 2. June 2012. P18

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A Transit of Venus Primer
William Tobin

I outline the science and history of Venusian transits, concentrating on points which may be useful when presenting June's transit to members of the public.
Volume 51, number 1. March 2012. P3

Book Review - Transit of Venus: 1631 to the Present
Naomi Pasachoff

Volume 51, number 1. March 2012. P19

Royal Astronomical Society of New Zealand (Inc) Annual Report of Council for 2011

Volume 51, number 1. March 2012. P21

A Sense of Scale
Martin Unwin

The most important reason to watch the 2012 Transit of Venus has nothing to do with either history or rarity, and everything to do with astronomy. It's about scale.
Volume 51, number 1. March 2012. P42

A .pdf for this issue is not currently available.

Southern Stars: Volume 50, number 4. December 2011. Pp 1 - 32.
Teaching Astronomy at the University of Cambridge:

a Comparative Study of Astronomy Courses at Cambridge and Canterbury John Hearnshaw. In the northern summer of 2011, I had the privilege of spending two wonderful months at the University of Cambridge; in August and September.
Volume 50, number 4. December 2011. Pp

The Search for Surveyor VII
Maurice Collins.

A review of Surveyor VII's accomplishments is given followed by an account of the author's research to find an image of the Moon's surface that shows the craft; pinpointing its position.
Volume 50, number 4. December 2011. Pp

High Energy Cosmic Ray Detection by Radar
Jack Baggaley.

A method of mapping the atmospheric trajectories of ultra high energy primary cosmic rays is outlined. The characteristics of radar reflections from the plasma generated by a cosmic ray is examined. It is shown that a radar system employing appropriate radiowave modulation and geometrical arrangement of antennas should be capable of measuring the trajectories of such incident extremely energetic particles.
Volume 50, number 4. December 2011. Pp

Lunt Solar Telescopes - a Review
Stephen Chadwick and Simon Hills.

The Lunt solar telescopes; LS35THa and LS60THa, are reviewed by members of the Foxton Beach Astronomical Society which has purchased one each of these instruments. Volume 50, number 4. December 2011. Pp 18-20 Recent Sunspot Activity R W Evans. Following Solar Minimum, generally accepted to have occurred in 2008 December, the Sun's spots have gradually increased in number.
Volume 50, number 4. December 2011. P

BackyardEOS: a Software Solution for Imaging with a Canon EOS DSLR
John Field.

A low price software package for controlling imaging with the Canon EOS DSLR camera is reviewed. This will be of use for both astrophotography and photometry.
Volume 50, number 4. December 2011. Page

Book Review:"Hindsight and Popular Astronomy" by Alan B. Whiting. reviewed by William Tobin.

Volume 50, number 4. December 2011. Pp

A .pdf for this issue is not currently available.

Southern Stars: Volume 50, number 3. September 2011. Pp 1 - 20.
Under Capricorn - under Cancer

William Tobin. Looking up and admiring the heavens is part of what astronomy is about. But what to do when the sky is unavailable for some reason? Construct a plasterboard dome rising into the roof space above your ceiling?and paint on the stars!
Volume 50, number 3. September 2011. Pp

Tailed Radio Galaxies as Environmental Probes
Siamak Dehghan and Melanie Johnston-Hollitt.

We provide a brief overview of tailed radio galaxies and discuss how their morphology relates to the environment in which they reside. We report on the initial results of our simulations on the galaxy PKS J0334-3900 which show that a combination of cluster weather and orbital motion are required to generate the observed radio tails. Finally we show 12 newly detected HT galaxies in the Chandra Deep Field-South, including galaxy S447 - the most distant HT ever found.
Volume 50, number 3. September 2011. Pp

Jupiter Galilean Moons Mutual Extinction Events
John Talbot and Scott Degenhardt.

Occultations of stars by planets such as Pluto have been used to detect and determine the structure of the planet's atmosphere. During the period of Jupiter moon mutual occultations and eclipses (JMEs) in 2008-09 some observers recorded apparent small changes in light flux before and after the main predicted events.
Volume 50, number 3. September 2011. Pp